845 Quince Orchard Blvd. Suite H, Gaithersburg, MD 20878
301-527-2727

Frequently Asked Questions

The cost of veneers is not generally covered by insurance. To be certain, check with our friendly staff at Quince Orchard Dental Care.

Dental veneers do not require any special care. Continue to follow good oral hygiene practices, including brushing and flossing as you normally would.

Even though porcelain veneers resist stains, your dentist may recommend that you avoid stain-causing foods and beverages (for example, coffee, tea, or red wine).

Veneers on average last between 5 and 10 years. How long your Veneer lasts directly correlates with your home care and how well you take care of your veneers. There are patients that have veneers that are older than 10 years and they still look great.

  • They provide a natural tooth appearance.
  • Gum tissue tolerates porcelain well.
  • Porcelain veneers are stain resistant.
  • The color of a porcelain veneer can be selected such that it makes dark teeth appear whiter.

Getting a dental veneer usually requires three trips to the dentist – one for a consultation, two and three to make and apply the veneers. One tooth or many teeth can simultaneously undergo the veneering process described below.
Diagnosis and treatment planning
This first step involves your active participation. Explain to Dr. Rouhanian and our staff the result that you are trying to achieve. During this appointment, Dr. Rouhanian will examine your teeth to make sure dental veneers are appropriate for you and discuss what the procedure will involve and some of its limitations. He also may take X-rays and possibly make impressions of your mouth and teeth.
Preparation
To prepare a tooth for a veneer, your dentist will remove about 1/2 millimeter of enamel from the tooth surface, which is an amount nearly equal to the thickness of the veneer to be added to the tooth surface. Before trimming off the enamel, you and your dentist will decide the need for a local anesthetic to numb the area. If you are a candidate for no prep veneers then there is no need to remove any tooth structure from your teeth. Next, Dr. Rouhanian will take an impression of your tooth. This model is sent out to a dental laboratory, which in turn constructs your veneer. It usually takes 1-2 weeks for your dentist to receive the veneers back from the laboratory. For very unsightly teeth, temporary dental veneers can be placed for an additional cost.
Bonding
Before the dental veneer is permanently cemented to your tooth, your dentist will temporarily place it on your tooth to examine its fit and color. He or she will repeatedly remove and adjust the veneer as needed to achieve the proper fit; the veneer color can be adjusted with the shade of cement to be used. Next, to prepare your tooth to receive the veneer, your tooth will be cleaned, polished, and etched — which roughens the tooth to allow for a strong bonding process. A special cement is applied to the veneer and the veneer is then placed on your tooth. Once properly position on the tooth, your dentist will apply a special light beam to the dental veneer, which activates chemicals in the cement, causing it to harden or cure very quickly. The final steps involve removing any excess cement, evaluating your bite and making any final adjustments in the veneer as necessary. Dr. Rouhanian may ask you to return for a follow-up visit in a couple of weeks to check how your gums are responding to the presence of your veneer and to once again examine the veneer’s placement.

The problem of teeth grinding is not limited to adults. Approximately 15% to 33% of children grind their teeth. Children who grind their teeth tend to do so at two peak times — when their baby teeth emerge and when their permanent teeth come in. Most children lose the teeth grinding habit after these two sets of teeth have come in more fully.
Most commonly, children grind their teeth during sleep rather than during waking hours. The most common suspected reason for grinding in children is tooth eruption. It is believed that the grinding serves as a soothing mechanism to counteract the pressure of erupting teeth. Other possible causes of pediatric grinding include improperly aligned teeth or irregular contact between upper and lower teeth, illnesses and other medical conditions (such as nutritional deficiencies, pinworms, allergies, endocrine disorders), and psychological factors including anxiety and stress.
Grinding of the baby teeth rarely results in problems. However, teeth grinding can cause jaw pain, headaches, wear on the teeth, and TMD. Consult your dentist if your child’s teeth look worn or if your child complains of tooth sensitivity or pain.
Ask our dentists to monitor your child’s teeth if he or she is a grinder.
No intervention is usually required with preschool-age children. However, older children may need temporary crowns or other methods, such as a night guard, to prevent the grinding.

Because grinding often occurs during sleep, most people are unaware that they grind their teeth. However, a dull, constant headache or sore jaw is a telltale symptom of bruxism. Many times people learn that they grind their teeth by their loved one who hears the grinding at night.

Although teeth grinding can be caused by stress and anxiety, it often occurs during sleep and is more likely caused by an abnormal bite or missing or crooked teeth.

If you think your dry mouth is caused by certain medication you are taking, talk to the doctor who prescribed you the medication. He or she may adjust the dose you are taking or switch you to a different drug that doesn’t cause dry mouth.

  • An oral rinse to restore mouth moisture may be prescribed. If that doesn’t help a medication that stimulates saliva production may be prescribed.
  • Other steps you can take that may help improve saliva flow include:
  • Sucking on sugar-free candy or chewing sugar-free gum
  • Drinking plenty of water to help keep your mouth moist
  • Protecting your teeth by brushing with a fluoride toothpaste, and using a fluoride rinse
  • Breathing through your nose, not your mouth, as much as possible
  • Using a room vaporizer to add moisture to the bedroom air
  • Using an over-the-counter artificial saliva substitute

It is certainly important for infants and children between the ages of 6 months and 16 years to be exposed to fluoride. This is the timeframe during which the primary and permanent teeth come in. However, adults benefit from fluoride, too.

New research indicates that topical fluoride — from toothpastes, mouth rinses and fluoride treatments — is as important in fighting tooth decay as in strengthening developing teeth.

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