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Frequently Asked Questions

In most cases, the recovery period lasts only a few days. The following will help speed recovery:

  • If painkillers are needed they will be prescribed by Dr. Rouhanian
  • After 24 hours, rinse your mouth gently with warm salt water several times a day to reduce swelling and relieve pain. Make your own salt water by mixing 1 tsp (5 g) of salt in a medium-sized glass 8 fl oz of warm water.
  • Relax after surgery. Physical activity may increase bleeding.
  • Avoid smoking.
  • Eat soft foods, such as gelatin, pudding, or a thin soup. Gradually add solid foods to your diet as healing progresses.
  • Do not lie flat. This may prolong bleeding. Prop up your head with pillows.
  • Avoid rubbing the area with your tongue.
  • Continue to carefully brush your teeth and tongue.

After the tooth is removed, you may need stitches. Some stitches dissolve over time, and some have to be removed after a few days. Dr. Rouhanian will tell you whether your stitches need to be removed.

  • Use the minimum amount necessary to provide the maximum benefit. Apply less than you think you need, and then gradually increase the amount until you feel comfortable.
  • Distribute the adhesive evenly on the tissue bearing surface of the denture.
  • Apply or reapply when necessary to provide the desired effect.
  • Always apply the adhesive to a thoroughly clean denture.
  • Remember adhesives work best with a well-fitting denture.

Your dentist or prosthodontist will instruct you as to how long to wear dentures and when to remove them. During the first several days after receiving your denture, you may be asked to wear it all the time, including while you sleep. Although this may be temporarily uncomfortable, it is the quickest way to identify the areas on the denture that may need adjustment. Once adjustments are made, you should remove dentures before going to bed. This allows gum tissues to rest and allows normal stimulation and cleansing by the tongue and saliva. The denture can be put back in the mouth in the morning.

After getting dentures, you may have difficulty pronouncing certain words. If so, practice by saying the difficult words out loud. With practice and with time you will become accustomed to speaking properly with dentures.

Eating with new dentures will take a little practice and may be uncomfortable for some wearers for a few weeks. To get used to the new denture, patients will need to start with soft foods cut into small pieces and chew slowly using both sides of the mouth. As you get used to new dentures, add other foods until you return to a normal diet. You will need to be cautious with hot or hard foods, sharp-edged bones or shells and avoid foods that are extremely sticky or hard. You may want to avoid chewing gum while you adjust to the denture. Also, don’t use toothpicks while wearing dentures.

Dentures are made to closely resemble your natural teeth so there should be no noticeable change in appearance. In fact, dentures may even improve your smile and fill out your facial appearance.

New dentures may feel a little odd or loose for a few weeks until the muscles of the cheeks and tongue learn to keep them in place and you get comfortable inserting and removing them. Also, it is not unusual for minor irritation or soreness to occur and for saliva flow to increase when you first start wearing dentures, but these problems will diminish as the mouth adjusts.

Yes, dental implants can be used to support permanently cemented bridges, eliminating the need for a denture. The cost is a bit higher, but the implants and implant bridges more closely resemble the feel of real teeth. Dental implants are becoming the alternative to dentures, but not everyone is a candidate for implants.

Most insurance plans pay for root canal treatments as it is typically within the realm of dental coverage. This oftentimes makes root canals an affordable procedure for those who need to remove the pain and discomfort.

For the first few days following the completion of a root canal, the tooth may feel sensitive due to natural tissue inflammation, especially if there was pain or infection before the procedure. This sensitivity or discomfort usually can be controlled with over-the-counter pain medications such as Advil, Motrin, Aleve. Most patients can return to their normal activities the next day.

Until your root canal procedure is completely finished — that is to say, the permanent filling is in place and/or the crown, it’s wise to minimize chewing on the tooth under repair. This step will help avoid recontamination of the interior of the tooth and also may prevent a fragile tooth from breaking before the tooth can be fully restored.

Saving your natural teeth is the very best option, if possible. Your natural teeth allow you to eat a wide variety of foods necessary to maintain proper nutrition. In this regard, the root canal procedure is the treatment of choice.

The only alternative to a root canal procedure is having the tooth extracted and replaced with a bridge, implant, or removable partial denture to restore chewing function and prevent adjacent teeth from shifting.

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